Dentures

What are dentures?

A denture is a removable prosthesis used to replace missing teeth. Commonly referred to as ‘false teeth’, a denture is usually made of acrylic or a combination of acrylic and metal. A partial denture is fitted to replace some missing teeth whilst a complete denture is indicated when all natural teeth are missing. A good set of dentures helps you to eat, speak, function, and often improves a person’s appearance.

How long does it take to make dentures?

Depending on the complexity of each case, the duration of the treatment will vary. After the initial visit of examination and diagnosis, the subsequent visits will include taking impressions of the mouth, bite registration, try-in of the denture, fitting and review.

What to expect?

New dentures always feel strange when first placed in your mouth. Several days or weeks will be required before you get accustomed to them. Adaptation varies with different persons and often time and experience are essential before dentures can be worn comfortably and function effectively.

Useful suggestions to help you to adapt to the new dentures:

Eating – Eating will take a little practice. Start with soft foods and foods cut into small pieces will help. Chew slowly using both sides of your mouth at the same time to prevent dentures from tipping. Once you become accustomed to chewing, include other foods until you return to your normal diet.

Increased salivary flow – You may experience an increase in salivary flow when the dentures are first inserted. This is a natural response of the salivary glands that will return to normal after a few weeks. You can improve the situation by swallowing more often.

Speech – New dentures may alter your speech initially. Pronouncing certain words may require practice. Reading out loud and repeating troublesome words will speed up the adaptation process. This problem rarely persists beyond two weeks.

Sore spots – Minor irritation caused by surface irregularities or pressure spots on the denture-bearing areas are quite common. Your dentist will relieve the discomfort by adjusting the denture surface. Stop wearing the denture if the irritation is very painful. Consult your dentist immediately.


Implants

What are implants?

Implants are one way of replacing missing teeth. A post is planted in the jaw bone to support a replacement tooth. This acts like the root of a natural tooth. Implants can also be used to support fixed bridges or dentures.

Implant treatment normally has two stages. First, the implant is placed in the jaw. Then, when the jaw has healed, replacement teeth are attached to the implant. In some situations it is possible for temporary teeth to be attached to an implant at the time of fitting.

Would implants be right for me?

First, you should decide whether implants could be right for you. Contact us to arrange an implant consultation and discussion and we will let you know the possibilities. Our team will be only too happy to help you with any questions you may have.

If you decide to go ahead, this is what will happen.

  • Implants are put into holes in the jaw with a local anaesthetic. You can opt to have sedation for this procedure also.
  • The implant is screwed or pushed in and the gum is stitched so that it heals over the implant
  • Under the gum. the bone then grows round the implant to hold it firm. This takes several months.

Implants usually have two sections – the post in the jaw and an extension that is added later when the post is secure. Attaching the extension needs a small cut in the gum above the implant. You might have more than one implant. The replacement teeth might be fixed permanently (like a crown or bridge) or attached in a way which lets you remove them for cleaning (like a denture).